Welcome to Dinodentures – The Works of Jens Kosch

This is the home of the scientific endeavors of the paleontologist Jens Kosch.

 

 

Read the mission statement, to figure out what I do and why I do it.

 

 

 

CV snapshot. headings: education, employment, teaching expereince, publications, public engagement and science communication, grants

 

 

Take a look at my CV, to see where I come from.

 

 

 

 

 

Get a hold of my outreach work, to learn how I engage the public.

 

 

Take a peek at the fieldwork I have done, to explore where I have worked to find fossils.

 

 

Publications Schwarz D, Kosch JCD, Fritsch G, Hildebrandt T (2015). Dentition and tooth replacement of Dicraeosaurus hansemanni (Dinosauria, Sauropoda, Diplodocoidea) from the Tendaguru Formation of Tanzania. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 35(6), e1008134-2 Kosch JCD, Zanno LE (in review). Sampling impacts assessments of tooth growth and replacement rates calculations in archosaurs: implications for paleontological studies. PeerJ,2020:03:47061:0:1:NEW; Presentations Kosch JC, Zanno LE (2019). Tooth Morphometrics can Differentiate Morrison Formation Diplodocids. 79th Annual Meeting of the Society for Vertebrate Paleontology (Poster Presentation) Sokolskyi T, Zanno L, Kosch JC (2019). Unusual Tooth Replacement in a New Cenomanian Iguanodontian from the Mussentuchit Member of the Cedar Mountain Formation. 79th Annual Meeting of the Society for Vertebrate Paleontology (Poster Presentation) Kosch JCD, Canoville A, Zanno LE (2018). Assessing Methodological Biases on Tooth-Age and Dentin Deposition Rate Estimates in Extinct Taxa: A Study on Alligator mississippiensis. 78th Annual Meeting of the Society for Vertebrate Paleontology (Poster Presentation) Kosch JCD, Zanno LE (2017). A New Protocol for the Study of Polyphyodont Dentitions With Multiple Replacement Teeth. 77th annual meeting of the Society for Vertebrate Paleontology (Poster Presentation)

 

 

Read through my publication list, to understand what of my research is already in the literature.

 

 


Why dinodentures? – The teeth of sauropods, and among the extant fauna of toothed whales, have a tendency to be preserved as complete tooth rows, divorced of the jaw bones. Scientists assume that strong types of tissue were holding them together even during the decaying process and that allowed whole dentitions to slip out and become embedded in sediment. There is still uncertainty if the connecting tissue was more like tough tooth gum as in whales or part of beak-like cover of the jaw tips.

“Denture” of the late Jurassic African sauropod Giraffatitan brancai (specimen MB.R.2390, Museum für Naturkunde Berlin, Germany)